How To: Convert Your HTC One into a Google Edition HTC One for an Enhanced Nexus Experience

Convert Your HTC One into a Google Edition HTC One for an Enhanced Nexus Experience

How to Convert Your HTC One into a Google Edition HTC One for an Enhanced Nexus Experience

Ditching Sense (HTC's stock Android Launcher) is a great way to breathe new stock-like life into your HTC One smartphone without rooting, but even that has its limitations. If you really want the full Google experience, albeit with some extras, CyanogenMod has always been the go-to ROM. In effect, this will give you an experience similar to the Google Nexus or the new HTC One Google Edition.

To get CyanogenMod on your HTC One or other HTC device, you'll need to be rooted first with the TWRP recovery installed. You can find out how to do that in my rooting guide for the HTC One. After you're rooted, just follow these quick directions.

Step 1: Download CyanogenMod & Google Apps

On your computer, go to get.cm and download the newest nightly build for your device. The HTC One is known as the "m7", so find the m7 version that goes with your carrier. I'll be using the AT&T version.

Next, to get access to Google Services (Play Store, Gmail, etc.), download the latest build for Android Jelly Bean onto your computer from Techerrata. These can be identified by the "gapps-jb" at the beginning of the file name.

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Transfer the downloaded .zip files to your phone either over the air or using a USB cable.

Step 2: Backup!

If you haven't already, create a backup of your phone in case you have any problems with CyanogenMod. Instructions for doing this using TWRP can be found on our rooting guide.

Step 3: Wipe Your Device

Before you can install CyanogenMod, you'll need to reformat your device. Press and hold Power and Volume Down simultaneously to boot into the bootloader.

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Next, press Volume Down to highlight Recovery, then press Power again. When TWRP loads, tap Wipe and swipe to confirm.

Step 4: Install CyangenMod & Google Apps

Go back to TWRP's main menu and tap Install. Navigate to the directory where you copied the CyanogenMod and Google Apps files. Mine are on the root of the internal storage (not inside any folder).

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Tap the CyanogenMod zip, then tap Add More Zips. Navigate to the directory where the Google Apps are, and this time, tap the gapps file, then swipe to confirm.

When it's done, select Reboot System.

Step 5: Personalize

Now that you're on Android 4.2.2, you have more options in terms of widgets and other customizations. My favorite is DashClock because you can find tons of extensions for it on Google Play. By itself, it will show you weather, SMS and Gmail counts, the next alarm, calendar entries, and of course, the time. That's a lot of info for a 4x2 space!

That's just one app, but now that you're on the newest version of Android, your app selection won't be limited by how old your device is. If you've got a favorite customization, be sure to let us know about it in the comments section.

6 Comments

Please comment on comparison between CM vs. ARHD, pros & cons

The comparison is similar to that of Sense 5 vs any AOSP ROM. AOSP will always be more lightweight and snappier. You can optimize all you want with Sense ROMs but bigger programs are slower. It might not be noticeable at first, but over time, with more apps installed, AOSP will respond faster.

The biggest reason I like CM and other AOSP ROMs is because they're so customizable. If you want to change your battery icon, you don't have to flash a mod. You just go in the settings and do it. There are many other features AOSP ROMs have, and you will be able to upgrade to the next version of Android sooner.

Stock ROMs also have positives. They are more stable, since they're based off of software made specifically for this phone. The camera is better (at least the post processing; the sensor feeds the same data to the OS whether AOSP or Sense), and you're less able to install mods that will break something.

I would suggest trying both out. Everyone is different. Even I can't make up my mind. I sometimes switch back to Sense for a few months before going back to AOSP when a new version of Android is released.

Its cool to use Google applications on HTC M7, but how i can, as my phone is locked. How i unlock it? i have seen low-cost unlock codes offer on safeunlockcode.com...is it will be fine to buy code from them.

Unfortunately there is no way that I know of to SIM-unlock your phone for free. You would have to get an unlock code from your carrier or buy a SIM-unlock from one of those sites.

Can I do this on the Htc one M9?

As of right now CyanogenMod does not support the M9, but a release should be pushed out in the near future.

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